Blog

Video – Gina Rinehart’s Developing Northern Australia Conference Speech

by 8 July 2017

20 June 2017

Speech delivered by Hancock and Kidman Executive Chairman Gina Rinehart to the Developing Northern Australia Conference in Cairns, Australia on 20 June 2017.

Good afternoon distinguished guests, ANDEV members, and fellow North Australians.

May I firstly thank the Association for Sustainability in Business, the Conference Advisory Committee and the sponsors for organising today’s important event.

I am happy to be speaking with you about the potential for progress, investment and growth in what is one of my favourite parts of our country, the North.

This afternoon I would like to talk about agriculture and its ability to contribute towards developing our north, along with the changes needed by our governments to reduce red tape, decrease government costs and support the development of this region by not acting as an impediment to development and growth in the north.

Secondly, I will talk about some private sector investments in our North, investment being essential to maintain and improve living standards for northern Australians. Investment needs to be encouraged, as I’ve often said when advocating ANDEV’s policies, in particular that of a huge special economic zone across our north.

Agriculture’s ability to develop northern Australia

We are on the verge of an exciting time in agriculture with indicators spelling a bright future for the industry, providing Australia remembers it must be cost competitive. Cattle prices are strong, the value of agricultural land is increasing, and innovative agritech is becoming more useful.

On top of this, overseas demand for our cleaner agricultural produce is growing strongly and this growth is certain to continue as the globe’s population and Asia’s middle class continues to expand, the latter expected to grow to over three billion people by 2030.

On my many trips to Asia, it has become very obvious that we, Australia, are an integral part of the Asian region and therefore need free trade agreements in the region, and not be left out.  We need to progress both Australasian and Austral-Pacific free trade agreements, in addition to bilateral agreements. More trade with Asia will not only help us to prosper as a nation but will provide an important way to develop out northern region.

We are blessed to be a country with a large land mass, but unfortunately vast areas lay idle and underutilised, particularly in our north.

Australia lagging well behind in cattle numbers

To illustrate just how much room our agricultural industry and our north has to grow compare Australia and Brazil.

Both are the largest two countries in the Southern Hemisphere with similar land masses – Australia at 7.69 million square kilometres, and Brazil just a little larger.

Both are leading economies in their regions and both experience similar climatic conditions in many parts of their countries.

Please ask yourself, how many head of beef cattle does Brazil have?

And, how many head of cattle do you think Australia has? The answer is astonishing.

Approximately, Brazil currently has more than 225 million head of beef cattle, compared to Australia’s mere less than 27 million, declining in recent years.

That’s right – Brazil, a country with a similar land mass has a cattle industry approx. 10 times bigger than Australia’s and we are supposed to be world leaders in agriculture!

This comparison illustrates that Australia has a huge capacity to grow our agriculture industries.

We have the room, we have the skills, we have the knowhow, we have the history, and the Asian market right on our doorstep. We can achieve a cattle industry that is in the order of Brazil’s, only if our governments cut red tape, and does not jeopardise our northern region.

Government impediments to developing our northern agricultural industry

Too often those in government and the bureaucracy implement growth and investment deterring regulations from capital cities without realising the adverse impact that they will have.

And, it’s not just me saying this – The Institute of Public Affairs’ researchers determined last year that the cost of red tape to the economy annually is a staggering $176 billion, equating to 11 per cent of GDP.

In short, the economic costs of red tape are larger than the size of the agriculture and mining sectors combined.

Concerningly, a Productivity Commission report last year also concluded that farm businesses are “subject to a vast and complex array of regulations.”

Their report also went on to say that “regulations are in place at every stage of the supply chain – from land acquisition to marketing – and are applied by all levels of government.”

The report stated that because of their sheer number and vast complexity “the cumulative burden of regulation on farmers is substantial.”

Excessive regulation, red tape and other government costs are, as respected business commentator Terry McCrann says, nothing more than taxes in disguise.

Making it easier for famers to do business is key to ensuring that Australia doesn’t miss this massive opportunity to develop and grow the north.

Take just one example of government regulation that acts to prevent our industry from developing.

Many of you would know of the Fitzroy River in the Kimberley’s in West Australia.

Across the average wet season, approximately 7,000 gigalitres of water is wasted as it uselessly overflows into the ocean.

Now, 7,000 gigalitres of water can be hard to put into perspective but think of it this way, The Fitzroy could fill, 14 times, the huge Sydney Harbour. In other words the Fitzroy waters flow past may stations unused into the sea.

As it stands in 2017 the government only allows one water licence to access water from the Fitzroy River for Liveringa, in the Kimberley’s.

And guess how much water the government permits to be taken? Six gigalitres.

This leaves 99.9991% of the water to run out uselessly into the Indian Ocean.

We all know that water is absolutely essential for cattle and to grow cattle numbers and that for many months water can be very difficult to obtain, unless already stored, or from bores.

How can we advance the North if one of its biggest industries is prevented from accessing a vital asset for growth, water?

We can’t raise cattle without adequate water supplies, and we sure can’t match Brazil without adequate water supplies!

In short, if the government allowed us to tap into this huge wasted water source we would be able to increase our cattle numbers and just imagine the benefit to all the related industries which depend upon agriculture. It’s too often forgotten that it’s not just stations that would benefit from water and less red tape to let them grow, but the myriad of other industries, trough suppliers, tank suppliers, truckers, hydraulic crusher suppliers, and many more who would grow along with an increasing agricultural industry.

Innovative agritech investments essential to growth and development

Another factor important to northern development and to advancing our agricultural sector is investment in state-of-the-art, practical technology.

At Hancock, we are undertaking large-scale investment in agritech across both our Hancock and Kidman stations, the majority of which are located in northern Australia.

We are rolling out the digitalised UHF system and walk-over weighing systems, which I will mention shortly, as well as solar pumps, hydraulic lifts, hydraulic weaner cradles and soon, drones.

The digitalised UHF system enables clear and quick and widespread communication from anywhere on the property to anywhere in Australia or overseas, through the use of a handheld device.

The digitalised UHF devices enable private and group phone calls, text messages, brief emails and can transmit emergency notices so emergencies can be responded to quickly throughout the station, improving staff safety, and enabling greater knowledge and efficiency for managers.

The digitalised devices mean that a station manager inspecting cattle at the far-most point of say Ruby Plains station in northern Australia for example, can in a few seconds, speak directly with his station staff, Kidman’s head office over 2,500 kilometres away in Adelaide or a customer in Tokyo over 6,000 kilometres away.

Another major technology we are rolling out is walk-over weighing, an innovative self-mustering technology which improves station efficiency and animal welfare through reducing the need for mustering or re-mustering cattle, leaving the cattle more relaxed and able to eat and drink when they need.

Walk-over scales are fitted near a water point and record the weight of the cattle that walk over it.

The weight of each animal will indicate the most appropriate destination for it, and a corresponding gate will open leading it into a paddock if underweight or leave the cow in the yards if ready for market.

A technology we plan to adapt from our usage in the mining sector is the use of drones.

Drones are able to observe, photograph and film in real-time things such as dam levels, fences, fires, floods, licks, cattle movements and other operations.

Our drones will be able to carry and transport by air items weighing more than four kilograms, allowing for items such as tools, emergency supplies and medical needs such as epi-pens to be quickly and easily transported around the station.

At the inaugural Kidman board meeting with new owners in February and recent board meeting in May in Shanghai, the first ever Kidman board meeting in China, we agreed that we would reinvest this year’s profits so that we invest in these important technologies to grow and develop our stations.

Conclusion

Ultimately, if we are to get serious about developing the large untapped area in the north of our country we need to make sure that governments cut red tape, decrease government costs they impose and reduce impediments to development. Australia must always strive to be cost competitive.

The example of the Fitzroy River is a telling one but unfortunately there are many more examples of unfortunate government impediments right across the north.

The second crucial part to northern development is technology investment. As technology becomes more advanced we must harness its benefits.

I hope that you will join me later this year in Canberra as we launch Australia’s inaugural National Agriculture and Related Industries Day on 21 November.

This will be a day where we recognise the efforts of those who work in our agriculture industry and speak up for our industry and its importance to the Australian economy.

And of course, for those interested in the mining industry, please join us each year for the mining and related industries day, held annually on November 22.

I wish all attending an interesting and enjoyable conference, and let’s encourage the development of regional free trade agreements.

Thank you.

Article – ‘Natural resources drive a country’s economy’ conclude the key speakers at Global Natural Resources Conclave

by 22 June 2017

20 April 2017
India Partnered

‘Economic development cannot take a nation forward on its own. We need a society and economy which complement each other. ’- Narendra Modi

These inspiring lines from Prime Minister Narendra Modi underline the need for various socio and economic factors to work cohesively in order to achieve the desired development goals of a nation. And, a country can only progress if it aptly utilizes its natural resources to address its rising socio-economic challenges.

It is no secret that effective management of Natural Resources drives a country’s economy. Its immense potential can only be utilized if the countries develop a well thought out strategy to tap into its enormous potential. It goes without saying that the extractive sector can stimulate sustainable economic growth, create jobs and help bring people out of poverty.

The recently concluded Global Natural Resources Conclave, the first of its kind, organized by Network 18 and The Confederation of Indian Industry (CII), talked about the rapidly changing world scenarios that are making it mandatory for nations to explore their resource base to the hilt which will help them carve a niche for themselves at a global platform.

The conclave witnessed key industry speakers, several industry stalwarts and thinkers deliberate upon the present and the future challenges being faced by the ever-developing economy like ours, pertaining to the natural resources sector.

  • Highlighting how entrepreneurship and technology can drive India’s growth story, Vedanta Group Chairman Anil Agarwal talked about the vast contribution the natural resources sector can make to the existing economic development of the country.
  • Australia’s richest citizen Gina Rinehart, Executive Chairman of Hancock Prospecting – a privately owned mineral and exploration company, discussed the elimination of red tape and what both countries can hope to learn from each other.
  • JSW Group Chairman Sajjan Jindal underlined the need to make an optimum use of natural resources at the appropriate time so as to extract maximum benefits for the country’s economy.
  • Focusing on how policy changes can go a long way in improving India’s mineral resources landscape, Piyush Goyal, MoS (Independent Charge) for Power, Coal, New and Renewable Energy and Mines confirmed his faith in building a mutual development strategy for the nations.
  • Talking about the Global Natural Resources Conclave as a great platform to share ideas and discuss possibilities in the natural resources sector, Melody Meyer, President, Melody Meyer Energy LLC emphasized the need to pursue right investment strategies for energy development in India in the future.

The amalgamation of thought-provoking ideas with experts deliberating upon possibilities needed for growth of a country with respect to its natural resources sector at the Global Natural Resources Conclave paved the way for exploring some basic ground realities in terms of issues and opportunities concerning India’s natural resources.

Courtesy of India Partnered

DOUBLE WIN FOR GINA RINEHART AND ROY HILL AT THE PLATTS GLOBAL METALS AWARDS

by 6 June 2017

18 May 2017

Hancock Prospecting and Roy Hill are excited to announce that Executive Chairman, Mrs Gina Rinehart, and the Roy Hill project have been recognised at the prestigious Platts Global Metals Awards in London tonight, winning two awards.

Mrs Rinehart was awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award for her outstanding leadership in the mining and resources sector, and for her contribution to the development of that sector throughout her adult life.

Her leadership has included founding and patronage of Australia’s annual National Mining and Related Industries Day, many speeches on behalf of the industry and quarterly contributions to Australia’s Resources and Investment Magazine publication, founding and chair of Australians for Northern Development and Economic Vision (ANDEV), and two books, the most recent one called “From Red Tape to Red Carpet.”

Roy Hill, of which Mrs Rinehart is Executive Chair, was also recognised, winning the Rising Star Company Award for its spirit, milestones and impressive achievements as a largely Greenfield mega mine.

Accepting the Lifetime Achievement Award in London, Mrs Rinehart said she was very delighted to be acknowledged for a lifetime’s commitment and dedication to the mining and resources industry, most recently culminating in the highly successful delivery of the USD$10 billion Roy Hill iron ore project.

“The mining and resources industry with its many related industries is, I believe, a very important contributor to our country, and helps to maintain and improve living standards, so it means a lot to me to be recognised by my peers at these internationally renowned prestigious awards,” Mrs Rinehart said.

“There are many people who support me with these endeavours, especially Tad Watroba and my executives and my other hard-working, long-term and dedicated staff. We are also proud of our endeavours over decades at Hope Downs, three major mines were built there with our more recent partners, Rio Tinto, and a fourth is under development.”

Speaking following Roy Hill’s rising star win, Mrs Rinehart said of the project “we started very small, with very little money to spend, and worked hard to explore, finding the deposits which now form the Roy Hill operations, tenements another company had held for a long time, but chose to drop, believing of negligible value. Over many years we studied and progressed towards development despite all the thousands of government approvals permits and licences and other significant risks and roadblocks placed in front of us.”

“Roy Hill has achieved significant milestones – we are ramping up to be Australia’s single largest iron ore mine, we are the fastest to achieve shipment of 35 million tonnes and while doing so, maintained an above industry average safety record and female participation rate. We secured the world’s largest debt funding package for a mainly Greenfields land-based mining project from 19 of the largest banks in the world and five Export Credit Agencies, we use some of the world’s largest equipment in the mining industry, and Roy Hill marked the largest ever commercial deal between Australia and South Korea,” Gina Rinehart said.

“It has been a mammoth team effort to successfully manage the project from bankable feasibility to construction and ultimately to project operation and ramp up. Huge thanks to our partners, executives and every person who has contributed.”

ROY HILL RISING STAR WIN SPEECH

My partners, Marubeni, POSCO, together with ourselves at Hancock, are delighted to accept this prestigious award for Roy Hill.  Roy Hill at 55 million tonnes per annum is the single largest iron ore mine in Australia.  While other iron ore producers ship more than 55, they do that as a combination of production from multiple mines.  The scale of effort and inputs on which Roy Hill has been built make it a truly mega project.    The total amount of construction steel used for Roy Hill construction would be sufficient to build more than 20 Eiffel Towers.  The number of miles travelled by charter flights between Perth and minesite during the construction project equal three return trips to the moon!  To make it possible to a business of this size, complexity, quality ahead of schedule, under budget requires dedication, commitment, leadership of extraordinary nature.  Huge thanks to every person who contributed, and thank you again for this award.

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD WIN SPEECH   

Good evening, distinguished guests and friends.  It is a great privilege and pleasure to be with you all tonight, here in London.  London is thousands of miles away from where I grew up in the rugged north of West Australia, surrounded by heat, and dust, and flies, cattle and a heck of a lot of iron ore!  These have contributed to the rather unique Australian life that I have had, a wonderful life with my very special parents, Hope and Lang Hancock, and importantly have contributed to our country and it’s standards of living.  I would sincerely like to thank Platts for this prestigious lifetime award, which will have a place of honour in my heart and back in west Australia.  Thank you.

Article – Gina Rinehart & FMG Among Award Winners

by 5 June 2017

19 May 2017
National Mining Chronicle

Hancock Prospecting Group Executive Chairman Gina Rinehart, the Roy Hill project and Fortescue Metals Group were among the big winners at the prestigious Platts Global Metals Awards in London.

Mrs Rinehart was awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award for her leadership in the mining and resources sector, and for her contribution to the development of that sector throughout her adult life.

Her leadership has included founding and patronage of Australia’s annual National Mining and Related Industries Day, many speeches on behalf of the industry and quarterly contributions to Australia’s Resources and Investment Magazine publication, founding and chair of Australians for Northern Development and Economic Vision (ANDEV), and two books, the most recent one called “From Red Tape to Red Carpet.”

Roy Hill, of which Mrs Rinehart is also executive chair, was also recognised, winning the Rising Star Company Award for its spirit, milestones and impressive achievements as a largely Greenfield mega mine.

Accepting the Lifetime Achievement Award in London, Mrs Rinehart said she was very delighted to be acknowledged for a lifetime’s commitment and dedication to the mining and resources industry, most recently culminating in the highly successful delivery of the US$10 ($13.49) billion Roy Hill iron ore project.

“The mining and resources industry with its many related industries is, I believe, a very important contributor to our country, and helps to maintain and improve living standards, so it means a lot to me to be recognised by my peers at these internationally renowned prestigious awards,” Mrs Rinehart said.

“There are many people who support me with these endeavours, especially Tad Watroba and my executives and my other hard-working, long-term and dedicated staff. We are also proud of our endeavours over decades at Hope Downs, three major mines were built there with our more recent partners, Rio Tinto, and a fourth is under development.”

Speaking following Roy Hill’s rising star win, Mrs Rinehart said of the project “we started very small, with very little money to spend, and worked hard to explore, finding the deposits which now form the Roy Hill operations, tenements another company had held for a long time, but chose to drop, believing of negligible value. Over many years we studied and progressed towards development despite all the thousands of government approvals permits and licences and other significant risks and roadblocks placed in front of us.”

“Roy Hill has achieved significant milestones – we are ramping up to be Australia’s single largest iron ore mine, we are the fastest to achieve shipment of 35 million tonnes and while doing so, maintained an above industry average safety record and female participation rate. We secured the world’s largest debt funding package for a mainly Greenfields land-based mining project from 19 of the largest banks in the world and five Export Credit Agencies, we use some of the world’s largest equipment in the mining industry, and Roy Hill marked the largest ever commercial deal between Australia and South Korea,” Mrs Rinehart said.

“It has been a mammoth team effort to successfully manage the project from bankable feasibility to construction and ultimately to project operation and ramp up. Huge thanks to our partners, executives and every person who has contributed.”

Fortescue Metals Group (FMG), one of the world’s largest iron ore producers won the prestigious Metals Company of the Year award at the fifth annual Platts Global Metals Awards, which recognize exemplary performance in 15 categories across the steel, metals and mining complex.

FMG was one of 15 honorees from four continents heralded at the black-tie gala in central London. The event, hosted by S&P Global Platts, was once again emceed by CNBC’s Karen Tso and attended by more than 250 industry executives.

“Under the leadership of CEO Nev Power, Fortescue Metals Group has rapidly risen to become the fourth largest iron ore producer in the world in little over a decade. We congratulate Fortescue Metals Group on this impressive win,” S&P Global Platts President Martin Fraenkel said. “Each of this year’s winners and finalists deserves praise for their contributions to a more efficient, innovative and globalised industry that continues to rise to new challenges.”

Fortescue Metals Group won the 2017 Metals Company of the Year title as well as the Industry Leadership Award – Raw Materials & Mining. In reaching its decision, the Platts Global Metals Awards’ independent judging panel lauded the company’s “strong and clever” leadership. FMG, which won the Rising Star Company Award in 2014, was praised by the judges for “achieving ambitious goals and hitting targets” making the firm one of the industry’s strongest and most resilient.

Image: Gina Rinehart with Roy Hill Partners (Marubeni and POSCO) and Platts VPs and Karen Tso of CNBC, Credit: Roy Hill

Courtesy of the National Mining Chronicle

Article – On the road with Gina Rinehart under the vast NT sky

by 31 May 2017

27 May 2017
Sarah-Jane Tasker
The Australian

Gina Rinehart is covered in red dust — it’s filling her eyes and stubbornly settling on her face — as she inspects cattle at her top Northern Territory station, and despite the sun sitting high in the sky and a strong wind blowing desert dirt all over the Australian billionaire, she is smiling. Rinehart is fresh from a recent Kidman board meeting in Shanghai, with promises of further investment in new farming technologies, when The Weekend Australian joined her this week for a tour of Helen Springs station, the prized property in the Kidman portfolio.

Her passion for the land, born from a childhood spent on remote stations in the north of Western Australia, is on display as she plays tour guide of the remote property, about 140km north of Tennant Creek.

The softly-spoken Rinehart is in good spirits the night before touring the station, laughing with staff about an “in-joke” they all share and freely telling stories of recent travel. She is relaxed and excited about the potential to build on her cattle plans.

Helen Springs, the jewel in the crown of the Kidman properties, is a picture-perfect location for Rinehart to share her vision for her cattle empire. The homestead is an oasis in the desert, with a sprawling garden, filled with a variety of fruit trees — lemon, grapefruit and coconut palms — and pink roses in bloom.

Viewing the vast station from the air on the day of the tour, Rinehart’s sharp eye is scanning the land from the helicopter window, as she points out to the station manager she wants to see more shade for the animals. It soon becomes apparent the billionaire is a soft touch when it comes to the animals and is determined to ensure they have appropriate shade at watering holes and stockyards. “We want to shade the stockyards because we want to, not because we have to,” she says.

Rinehart is across every detail about the station and her wider cattle interests and she is confident the changes they are set to implement will lead the industry.

The country’s new “cattle queen” has ambitious plans to roll out state-of-the-art technology across the Kidman portfolio.

Australia’s third-richest person, with an estimated wealth of $10.41 billion, purchased the country’s largest pastoral portfolio, S. Kidman & Co, with Chinese joint venture partner Shanghai CRED, late last year. Her company, Hancock Prospecting, is the majority owner with a 67 per cent stake in the cattle company.

The $386.5m Kidman acquisition added 10 cattle stations, making up about 1.3 per cent of Australia’s total land area, to ­Rinehart’s agricultural portfolio. Following that acquisition Hancock became one of the top three beef producers in the country with a herd of about 300,000 cattle and it sells about 150,000 head a year.

Rinehart says her Chinese partners backed her early plan to forgo profits in the initial stages and leave the money in Australia to reinvest in the business.

“Every time we have presented a budget to our partners they have said yes,” she says. “They understand our desire to invest in, and improve, the properties.

“They are so proud to be part of an iconic company … it’s not just Australians who know about this deal, it’s also talked about in China. There is a responsibility and duty on the Chinese partners to show this joint venture can perform — China is watching.”

The board has already approved tens of millions of dollars in investment in its first two board meetings. Rinehart recalls that she was slightly nervous ahead of the first board meeting in February, knowing she was about to ask the Chinese to forgo early profits.

“Here we are saying you’ve just paid a fortune to get into these properties but by the way we don’t want you to take any profit, so I thought it might be a difficult board meeting and was a little nervous,” she says.

“By the time we got to the second meeting, we were asking for more budget approvals but he (Shanghai CRED principal Gui Guojie) is so supportive.”

The Weekend Australian understands that the board has approved a strategy to increase boxed beef and develop a branded product for the Kidman properties, with both a grain-fed and a grass-fed variety. That plan will expand the volume of boxed beef the company processes in South Australia and potentially Queensland.

Rinehart didn’t comment on reports that Hancock is preparing to sign a deal to export live cattle to China but the company is believed to be looking to eventually increase its live cattle exports after it increases its boxed beef product.

The plan to increase the herd is being supported by innovative technologies to be introduced to the Kidman properties.

Helen Springs, which sprawls over 5000sq km in the Barkly Tablelands, is top of the list to benefit from the new investment, and Rinehart wants to see the improvements rolled out progressively.

The station has an average carrying capacity of 24,000 to 26,000 head of cattle but a major water infrastructure program is planned, which will add another 9000 to the herd.

“While we have inadequate watering holes we are not properly using our paddocks,” Rinehart says.

“Cattle don’t like to walk too long to access water and paddocks are being under-used.”

Solar panels at windmills are also being introduced, a feature Rinehart says improves safety for staff and supports the environment.

The West Australian, whose company claims to be the country’s largest private taxpayer, having paid more than $3bn in taxes since 2011, says that more than 60 years ago her father, Lang Hancock, was using solar panels on his stations and had also introduced aerial mustering. She says he would be supportive of the new technologies and would be an early adopter.

Talking fondly of her father, Rinehart recalls her days as a child on her family stations and helping her dad when he was fixing the windmills. She says it was her role to lay out the tools and bring him the correct one when he yelled for it, climbing up and down the steep ladder each time.

Part of a muster at Helen Springs cattle stationPHOTO – Part of a muster at Helen Springs cattle station

Rinehart is also keen for the Kidman station managers to have access to helicopters. She overturned a previous Kidman rule that station managers couldn’t get a pilot’s licence and is actively encouraging managers who want to get a licence. Board approval has been given to pay for training and supply the helicopters.

“There was a policy in Kidman that managers weren’t allowed to fly, which was one of the first things we changed,” she says.

“We believe it gives managers a greater opportunity to know their station — they have to make so many decisions, it’s best they know their stations.”

The use of drones is another initiative Rinehart is excited about, having successfully trialled the program on a Hancock station in the Kimberley.

Chris Morrow, station manager at the Kimberley property, was flown to Shanghai recently to present the drone trial to the Kidman board.

He explains that one of the drones used has a wingspan of 2.5m and can be used to a radius of 40km, at a speed of 60km/h, with a carrying capacity of 4kg.

“The board were excited and my young team are also excited about new technology and what we can use the drones for,” he tells The Weekend Australian.

“It will make our operation more efficient than spending all day looking at things — we can send a drone out first and then target jobs.” Rinehart says that at the recent board meeting, Gui was rushing her through as he had another meeting to attend, but he was happy to slow it down when it came to the drones.

“He rushed us through the finances in record time but for the drone presentation I wasn’t getting told to hurry up,” she says.

“When it was time for Chris to give the presentation, Mr Gui was really animated.”

The young staff at Helen Springs are also excited about the possibilities technology will bring. The night Rinehart was arriving, the station staff shared with The Weekend Australian stories of their experience on the property with clear excitement about what the future holds.

As one station hand says: “Helen Springs is the station you want to work on, it’s one of the best.”

Peter Raleigh, the station manager at the neighbouring Bunchilly station, has a predominantly young staff, who he says are supportive of innovative technology and crave the changes coming through the industry.

“It’s exciting times for the company and as an industry as a whole. It’s a good time to be part of it all.”

PHOTO – Gina Rinehart at her Helen Springs cattle station.

Courtesy of The Australian

Article – Opportunity awaits in India, says Malcolm Turnbull

by 22 May 2017

7 April 2017
Geoff Chambers
The Australian

Malcolm Turnbull has described India as a “land of immense opportunity for Australia”, ahead of his first visit to the subcontinent powerhouse next week.

In a speech to the Sydney ­Institute last night, the Prime ­Minister outlined the importance of Australia’s ties with India, a day after billionaire Gina Rinehart warned the federal government to follow the economic lead of ­Narendra Modi.

“Alongside China, India is a land of immense opportunity for Australia,” Mr Turnbull said.

“Next week I will visit India, where Prime Minister Narendra Modi and I will follow on from our successful meeting at the G20 summit last year.

“India is undergoing a dramatic economic transformation and our close partnership creates opportunities for both nations.”

Speaking at a resources conference in New Delhi on Wednesday night, Mrs Rinehart said Australia needed to take decisive steps to “make doing business in Australia easier”.

Mr Turnbull said with an annual growth rate of more than 7 per cent, the Indian economy could be as large as that of the US by 2050.

“Our two-way trade is worth almost­ $20 billion per year, a figure that has nearly doubled in the last decade,” the Prime Minister said.

“And our total trade in services has more than tripled over the same period from $1.3bn to $4.4bn.”

With Indian mining giant Adani maintaining its commitment to the proposed $16.5bn Carmichael­ coalmine project in central Queensland, Mr Turnbull said his government was dedicated to ensuring “opportunities” across multiple industries.

Mr Turnbull and his delegation will target co-operation across a “wide range of sectors including energy, education and trade”.

The Prime Minister, who flies to Papua New Guinea this afternoon for a brief trip before travelling to India on Sunday, is expected to meet with Adani boss Gautam Adani, who has discussed his planned project with various Australian federal, state and local politicians.

“India wants to provide energy security through a range of technologies, including nuclear, clean coal, natural gas and renewable energy,’’ he said.

“Australia is well placed to provide­ many of the raw materials, and some of the latest tech­nology. The Indian government is also aiming to train 400 million people by 2022 — we can help them achieve this goal, both here and in India.”

Education Minister Simon ­Birmingham will travel with Mr Turnbull to promote Australian education providers.

“Education is already our ­second largest export to India, worth $2.3bn in 2015-16.

“India now represents the second­-highest source of inter­national students to Australia, with more than 60,000 in 2016. Australia is the second-most popular destination for Indian stud­ents after the US.”

Mrs Rinehart has warned the Turnbull government it must reboot­ falling investment in ­Australia, by following the leads of Mr Modi and US President Donald Trump.

“I keep reminding our governments that Australia needs to learn from the Indian leadership and now President Trump’s economic leadership also, by taking decisiv­e steps to make doing business in high-cost Australia easier, and rolling out the red carpet for investors,” she said.

Courtesy of the Australian

Article – Gina Rinehart to export cattle to China

by 15 May 2017

6 May 2017
Craig Dunlop
NT News

THE Territory’s largest landholder, and emerging cattle baroness, Gina Rinehart, has reportedly been spruiking long-term plans to develop the live export market into Asia, with proposals to ship 800,000 cattle to China a year.

The plan, if successful, would see China leapfrog Indonesia as the most significant export destination for Australia’s live cattle trade and could present a further boon for the Northern Territory.

Cattle industry publication Beef Central reports the Northern Territory, Western Australia and Queensland governments were handed briefs on Ms Rinehart’s plans last week, the details of which remain confidential.

Former chief minister turned Hancock Prospecting manager Adam Giles said the company’s plans were in the early stages and likely years away from fruition.

“If an agreement is formed, it will take possibly several years before first exports were to take place,” Mr Giles said.

Mr Giles said agreements would have to be struck with pastoralists to supply unprecedented numbers of cattle and said major construction projects would have to take place as part of the project.

“Mrs Rinehart continues to look for opportunities that will see investment in Northern Australia and the creation of Australian jobs,” Mr Giles said.

Mrs Rinehart’s Chinese partner in the S. Kidman & Co. buyout, Gui Guojie, in February sent a live cattle shipment to China from Portland, Victoria, prompting suggestions the S. Kidman & Co. empire would become geared towards supplying the Chinese market.

Chinese restrictions on importing cattle from areas affected by blue-tongue virus — including the Top End — have long been a sticking point for would-be exporters.

But industry players other than Mrs Rinehart, including export giant Wellard, have expressed optimism over developing the Chinese market, particularly in feeder cattle.

Displaying

Courtesy of NT News

Video – Gina Rinehart’s speech to the Global Food Forum

by 10 May 2017

Video – Gina Rinehart’s speech to the Sino-Australasian Entrepreneurs Summit (SAES)

by 10 May 2017

Articles on Gina Rinehart, Australia’s Cattle Queen

by 6 March 2017

4 March 2017

Australia’s richest woman Gina Rinehart is controversial, tough and very private. In a rare insight, the nation’s new cattle queen tells SA Weekend how she’s expanding her empire from mines to vast cattle stations as she builds on Sir Sidney Kidman’s legacy.

To read this and other articles on Gina Rinehart’s plans for her new cattle empire, plus her views on government regulation of investment and big business, click here.