An Iron Giant: Gina Rinehart

Sailing out across the turquoise waters of Port Hedland harbor aboard the Anangel Explorer, a vessel laden with the first shipment of iron ore from the US$10 billion Roy Hill Mine, is a moment that stands out of many milestones for mining magnate Gina Rinehart, the Executive Chair of Hancock Prospecting.

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Special economic zones as shield

The Philippines has at least 415 special economic zones. These are composed of manufacturing, IT Parks, tourism, agro-industrial and medical jurisdictions that enjoy the benefits and perks similar to other SEZs in other countries. Along with our other economic low-hanging fruits such as tourism, agriculture and export of services, these special zones are magnets of growth and development. They spur economic activities and boost our exports of goods and services. They generate immediate employment and allow our citizens to bring home much-needed support for their families.

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Choosing the Ideal Investment Location in Indonesia’s Special Economic Zones

Indonesia’s government has made the development of the country’s special economic zones (SEZ) a priority policy with the aim of attracting over US$50 billion in foreign investment over the next decade, particularly for SEZ-oriented manufacturing. As of 2022, there are 19 SEZs of which 12 are in operation and the remainder are in the construction phase. Eight are designated for tourism with the rest for manufacturing and processing. This policy is a recent development in Indonesia.

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WA agricultural sector ‘strangled’ by regulatory burden: Institute of Public Affairs

Red and green tape is “strangling” WA’s farming future, with the State’s environmental bureaucracy more than quadrupling since the year 2000 while employment in agriculture has declined by one-third. Mr Wild said despite pledges from successive State and Federal governments to relieve farmers of burdensome regulation, the evidence was clear red and green tape — and the bureaucrats that administered it — continued to increase. For context, he said the number of people employed in environmental departments and agencies nationwide — the “green tape army” — was now 20 per cent greater than the number of soldiers serving in Australia’s “regular army”. “There are now a staggering 34,600 people employed by environmental bureaucracies around Australia; Australia’s actual army is just over 29,000,” Mr Wild said.“The size of that green tape army has more than doubled since 2000, but our actual army has increased by a fifth.”

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