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Article – ‘We will have to take these people on’ – Joyce on environmental groups with tax-deductible gift recipient status

by 27 September 2017

6 September 2017 The Guardian 

I also need to track back to a speech the deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce made early this morning at the Minerals Council of Australia knees-up.

Barnaby Joyce at the Minerals Council of Australia’s minerals week seminar in the theatre of Parliament House on Wednesday morning. Photograph: Mike Bowers for the Guardian

The speech is a typical Joyce outing – it winds and twists and digresses – but there are some interesting chunks.

There were fighting words against environmental groups with tax-deductibility status campaigning against projects like Adani. As you read on it’s good to bear in mind the mining industry also wants to curb their behaviour.

Barnaby Joyce:

We will just have to take people head on. Those people collecting the tax deductibility to fight us, take them head on, and start selling back to the Australian people the economic message “this is how you are actually going to survive, this is how you are going to win as a nation”.

If you like hospitals that are payed for out of the public purse, if you like schools that are paid for out of the public purse, if you like to be defended as a nation paid for out of the public purse, if you like the roads and the freeways and the tunnels paid for out of the public purse, if you like to go to the Opera House and see all of the cultural events, a lot of them subsidised by the public purse then you’ve got to have an economy that creates a public purse.

You’ve got to have somebody somewhere making a buck. Simple as that.

Now speaking of people who make a buck …

Barnaby Joyce:

Who is our biggest individual taxpayer in Australia? Gina Rinehart. Oh that ‘terrible, terrible’ woman, Gina Rinehart, oh shocking. All that tax she’s paying, someone should stop her.

They could, all she has to do is move to Singapore, and it stops then. And then Singapore gets the money. And what about the tax that BHP, that Rio’s paid? These ‘terrible’ people paying all this tax, supporting all the infrastructure in our nation.

Sometimes they try and inspire a guilt complex for something but overwhelmingly the sustenance of our nation is determined by our primary exports, by our mineral exports. We’ve got to push back, we’ve got to sell that message.

Now speaking of pushing back, the Adani project … and the mining industry versus environmentalists, who I think become crocodiles by the end.

Barnaby Joyce:

Galilee Basin, we’re in the fight of our lives trying to open up a mechanism to provide wealth for this nation, this is total insanity. What is the next precinct? And when you say to these people, ‘OK if you don’t want that wealth what is your alternative?

‘What do you wish to put on the table? Where does this fantasia come from? Where is the wealth? If you don’t like coal, you don’t like iron ore or you don’t like the live cattle trade or you think that the sheep industry is “evil”.’ And I’ve seen this before because at the start we were involved with it a little bit with the timber industry.

I watched them close it down, I watched them close it down. So don’t think they can’t, they can. And they’ll pick you off one by one. The biggest mistake you make is you think you’re the fastest runner in the crocodile pen, you’re not, the crocodile will get you, and it’s just which one?

NATIONAL AGRICULTURAL AND RELATED INDUSTRIES DAY

by 7 September 2017

4 September 2017
Hancock Prospecting Group

A group of Australia’s foremost agricultural organisations is pleased to announce that Australia will celebrate pastoralists and farmers across the country in a national day.

“With the support of Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce and their government, I’m today very pleased to announce a day of celebration of all things agriculture will be held on November 21st,” Hancock Prospecting Executive Chairman Gina Rinehart said.

The inaugural National Agriculture and Related Industries Day will be on November 21, 2017, held annually on that date onwards.

The Pastoralists and Graziers Association of WA (PGAWA), Northern Territory Cattleman’s Association (NTCA), National Farmers Federation and Seafood Industry Australia have joined with Hancock Prospecting to help coordinate the inaugural day. The Federal Department of Agriculture is also assisting.

“It is time that we paused to consider and appreciate those hard working Australians on the land and in our oceans who ensure that we have enough to eat and drink everyday” said SIA’s Chair Veronica Papacosta.

“People in the outback spend their days dealing with the often very high temperatures, isolation, floods, fires, poisonous snakes, droughts and the wet and increasingly they are finding it even harder to deal with the snowballing government red tape” said NTCA’s Tracey Hayes.

“More access to clean water for cattle and crops is also a critical aspect of agriculture that we should action sooner rather than later. Greater access to clean water means cattle can be healthier and put on weight faster and more crops could be grown” stressed PGAWA President Tony Seabrook.

“For example in West Australia, allowing access to the huge Fitzroy River would help us achieve this and greatly benefit our industry. Every year 99.9991% of the Fitzroy river water is wasted as it flows uselessly out to the ocean, indeed staggering amounts as this water is enough to fill the huge Sydney harbour 14 times over”, added Mr Seabrook.

“Agriculture and their related industries is the most important employment sector in regional Australia and is the backbone of our rural communities,” Mrs Rinehart said.

Adding, “a national day of celebration is also a chance to further inform Australians about the importance of the agricultural industry, including its importance to then support related industries, help living standards plus the needs of the industry to enable it to be internationally cost competitive.

The day will culminate with a dinner at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra and industry award donated by Hancock Prospecting. For tickets to the dinner book via Trybooking link www.trybooking.com/RWOR

Mrs Rinehart added, “Our agriculture industry needs good spokespeople and leaders to stand up for our important industry, so those in the industry can strive for success and raise living standards. I’m looking forward to announcing the inaugural winners of the award that our company is initiating on 21 November”.

For more information about National Agriculture and Related Industries Day, please see www.agday.org.au

Media Contact: Hancock Prospecting Adam Giles 0421588118

 

 

Video – Gina Rinehart’s National Agriculture and Related Industries Day Message

by 7 September 2017

3 September 2017
Hancock Prospecting Group

National Agriculture and Related Industries Day will take place annually on November 21 and aims to recognise one of Australia’s most important industries.

Article – Celebrate Aussie agriculture

by 7 September 2017

6 September 2017
Moree Champion

From Broome to Bordertown, Bundaberg to Brunswick, all Australians are encouraged to celebrate the nation’s farm sector on November 21.

National Agriculture and Related Industries Day (AgDay) is the idea of Mrs Gina Rinehart and is being supported in its development by the National Farmers’ Federation (NFF) and the Federal Department of Agriculture and Water Resources (DAWR).

“All Australians can feel a sense of pride in our nation’s contribution to feeding and clothing the world,” Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources, Barnaby Joyce said.

“Australian produce is renowned and enjoyed the world over – from our chickpeas in India, our lamb in Saudi Arabia, Aussie beef in fine Japanese restaurants and Australian wine across the globe.

“The enviable properties of Australian wool and cotton see it featured on runways in Paris and Milan as well as on the backs of everyday global citizens.”

Liverpool Plains farmer, Fiona Simson said Australians, young and not so young, city or bush-based, could celebrate our country’s agriculture industries on Tuesday November 21.

“On AgDay there are many ways you can rejoice in our primary production prowess. Why not host a lunch with all-Aussie produce making up the menu, fire up a community barbecue and raise money for a good cause or simply share a pic of fabulous food or fibre on your social media networks.”

Visit agday.org.au for more great ideas on how to host your own AgDay celebrations.

Gina Rinehart, Executive Chairman of the Hancock Prospecting Group and Executive Chairman of Kidman & Co, said National AgDay was about recognising the contribution agriculture makes to our economic and social fabric.

“In 2016-2017 agricultural production was valued at $60 billion – that’s on-farm alone. Agriculture is Australia’s second largest export industry. The farm sector is also the powerhouse behind our regional communities.

“No matter what town it is in Australia, agriculture provides employment opportunities and supports small businesses that keep our country towns ticking.”

However you choose to mark AgDay, join the national conversation by sharing your celebrations on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram with the hashtag #AgDay

To find out more about AgDay visit agday.org.au.

Video – Gina Rinehart’s speech to the Myer Family’s Yulgilbar Field Day

by 5 September 2017

4 August 2017

Good afternoon Bails Myer, distinguished guests and friends,

I am delighted to be speaking at your special event at your historic and beautiful property.

I’m sorry I can’t be with you Bails and your friends personally but send my greetings from New York.

Yulgilbar is indeed historic. It was Sam Hordern, previous owner of Yulgilbar, who helped to first introduce the great Santa Gertrudis breed to Australia, bringing them from America. I also hear that Yulgilbar’s Santa Gertrudis stud is the third oldest in Australia and the largest in New South Wales. Congratulations to Sarah, Bails and the Myer family and best wishes to the Yulgilbar team.

From shares in properties to then one then two properties, spreading from the Pilbara and dating back to the second half of the 1800′s, our family too has a continuous history in the cattle business. I loved my early life growing up on our then two stations in the then remote still rugged and hot Pilbara, goodness have we seen changes since I used to scramble up windmills with tools for my father!

To read the complete speech, click Gina Rinehart’s Speech to the Myer Family’s Yulgilbar Field Day.

Courtesy of Mrs. Gina Rinehart

Articles – Gina Rinehart’s Chinese Live Export Deal

by 24 August 2017

9 June 2017
Various Media

Billionaire Gina Rinehart has signed a deal worth up to $500 million to export live cattle to China.

“Australia needs to export currently two-thirds of its cattle, so overseas markets must continue to be developed if we are to grow our cattle industry,” Ms. Rinehart said.

To read further, please click Gina’s Chinese beef export deal.

 

Video – Gina Rinehart’s Developing Northern Australia Conference Speech

by 8 July 2017

20 June 2017

Speech delivered by Hancock and Kidman Executive Chairman Gina Rinehart to the Developing Northern Australia Conference in Cairns, Australia on 20 June 2017.

Good afternoon distinguished guests, ANDEV members, and fellow North Australians.

May I firstly thank the Association for Sustainability in Business, the Conference Advisory Committee and the sponsors for organising today’s important event.

I am happy to be speaking with you about the potential for progress, investment and growth in what is one of my favourite parts of our country, the North.

This afternoon I would like to talk about agriculture and its ability to contribute towards developing our north, along with the changes needed by our governments to reduce red tape, decrease government costs and support the development of this region by not acting as an impediment to development and growth in the north.

Secondly, I will talk about some private sector investments in our North, investment being essential to maintain and improve living standards for northern Australians. Investment needs to be encouraged, as I’ve often said when advocating ANDEV’s policies, in particular that of a huge special economic zone across our north.

Agriculture’s ability to develop northern Australia

We are on the verge of an exciting time in agriculture with indicators spelling a bright future for the industry, providing Australia remembers it must be cost competitive. Cattle prices are strong, the value of agricultural land is increasing, and innovative agritech is becoming more useful.

On top of this, overseas demand for our cleaner agricultural produce is growing strongly and this growth is certain to continue as the globe’s population and Asia’s middle class continues to expand, the latter expected to grow to over three billion people by 2030.

On my many trips to Asia, it has become very obvious that we, Australia, are an integral part of the Asian region and therefore need free trade agreements in the region, and not be left out.  We need to progress both Australasian and Austral-Pacific free trade agreements, in addition to bilateral agreements. More trade with Asia will not only help us to prosper as a nation but will provide an important way to develop out northern region.

We are blessed to be a country with a large land mass, but unfortunately vast areas lay idle and underutilised, particularly in our north.

Australia lagging well behind in cattle numbers

To illustrate just how much room our agricultural industry and our north has to grow compare Australia and Brazil.

Both are the largest two countries in the Southern Hemisphere with similar land masses – Australia at 7.69 million square kilometres, and Brazil just a little larger.

Both are leading economies in their regions and both experience similar climatic conditions in many parts of their countries.

Please ask yourself, how many head of beef cattle does Brazil have?

And, how many head of cattle do you think Australia has? The answer is astonishing.

Approximately, Brazil currently has more than 225 million head of beef cattle, compared to Australia’s mere less than 27 million, declining in recent years.

That’s right – Brazil, a country with a similar land mass has a cattle industry approx. 10 times bigger than Australia’s and we are supposed to be world leaders in agriculture!

This comparison illustrates that Australia has a huge capacity to grow our agriculture industries.

We have the room, we have the skills, we have the knowhow, we have the history, and the Asian market right on our doorstep. We can achieve a cattle industry that is in the order of Brazil’s, only if our governments cut red tape, and does not jeopardise our northern region.

Government impediments to developing our northern agricultural industry

Too often those in government and the bureaucracy implement growth and investment deterring regulations from capital cities without realising the adverse impact that they will have.

And, it’s not just me saying this – The Institute of Public Affairs’ researchers determined last year that the cost of red tape to the economy annually is a staggering $176 billion, equating to 11 per cent of GDP.

In short, the economic costs of red tape are larger than the size of the agriculture and mining sectors combined.

Concerningly, a Productivity Commission report last year also concluded that farm businesses are “subject to a vast and complex array of regulations.”

Their report also went on to say that “regulations are in place at every stage of the supply chain – from land acquisition to marketing – and are applied by all levels of government.”

The report stated that because of their sheer number and vast complexity “the cumulative burden of regulation on farmers is substantial.”

Excessive regulation, red tape and other government costs are, as respected business commentator Terry McCrann says, nothing more than taxes in disguise.

Making it easier for famers to do business is key to ensuring that Australia doesn’t miss this massive opportunity to develop and grow the north.

Take just one example of government regulation that acts to prevent our industry from developing.

Many of you would know of the Fitzroy River in the Kimberley’s in West Australia.

Across the average wet season, approximately 7,000 gigalitres of water is wasted as it uselessly overflows into the ocean.

Now, 7,000 gigalitres of water can be hard to put into perspective but think of it this way, The Fitzroy could fill, 14 times, the huge Sydney Harbour. In other words the Fitzroy waters flow past may stations unused into the sea.

As it stands in 2017 the government only allows one water licence to access water from the Fitzroy River for Liveringa, in the Kimberley’s.

And guess how much water the government permits to be taken? Six gigalitres.

This leaves 99.9991% of the water to run out uselessly into the Indian Ocean.

We all know that water is absolutely essential for cattle and to grow cattle numbers and that for many months water can be very difficult to obtain, unless already stored, or from bores.

How can we advance the North if one of its biggest industries is prevented from accessing a vital asset for growth, water?

We can’t raise cattle without adequate water supplies, and we sure can’t match Brazil without adequate water supplies!

In short, if the government allowed us to tap into this huge wasted water source we would be able to increase our cattle numbers and just imagine the benefit to all the related industries which depend upon agriculture. It’s too often forgotten that it’s not just stations that would benefit from water and less red tape to let them grow, but the myriad of other industries, trough suppliers, tank suppliers, truckers, hydraulic crusher suppliers, and many more who would grow along with an increasing agricultural industry.

Innovative agritech investments essential to growth and development

Another factor important to northern development and to advancing our agricultural sector is investment in state-of-the-art, practical technology.

At Hancock, we are undertaking large-scale investment in agritech across both our Hancock and Kidman stations, the majority of which are located in northern Australia.

We are rolling out the digitalised UHF system and walk-over weighing systems, which I will mention shortly, as well as solar pumps, hydraulic lifts, hydraulic weaner cradles and soon, drones.

The digitalised UHF system enables clear and quick and widespread communication from anywhere on the property to anywhere in Australia or overseas, through the use of a handheld device.

The digitalised UHF devices enable private and group phone calls, text messages, brief emails and can transmit emergency notices so emergencies can be responded to quickly throughout the station, improving staff safety, and enabling greater knowledge and efficiency for managers.

The digitalised devices mean that a station manager inspecting cattle at the far-most point of say Ruby Plains station in northern Australia for example, can in a few seconds, speak directly with his station staff, Kidman’s head office over 2,500 kilometres away in Adelaide or a customer in Tokyo over 6,000 kilometres away.

Another major technology we are rolling out is walk-over weighing, an innovative self-mustering technology which improves station efficiency and animal welfare through reducing the need for mustering or re-mustering cattle, leaving the cattle more relaxed and able to eat and drink when they need.

Walk-over scales are fitted near a water point and record the weight of the cattle that walk over it.

The weight of each animal will indicate the most appropriate destination for it, and a corresponding gate will open leading it into a paddock if underweight or leave the cow in the yards if ready for market.

A technology we plan to adapt from our usage in the mining sector is the use of drones.

Drones are able to observe, photograph and film in real-time things such as dam levels, fences, fires, floods, licks, cattle movements and other operations.

Our drones will be able to carry and transport by air items weighing more than four kilograms, allowing for items such as tools, emergency supplies and medical needs such as epi-pens to be quickly and easily transported around the station.

At the inaugural Kidman board meeting with new owners in February and recent board meeting in May in Shanghai, the first ever Kidman board meeting in China, we agreed that we would reinvest this year’s profits so that we invest in these important technologies to grow and develop our stations.

Conclusion

Ultimately, if we are to get serious about developing the large untapped area in the north of our country we need to make sure that governments cut red tape, decrease government costs they impose and reduce impediments to development. Australia must always strive to be cost competitive.

The example of the Fitzroy River is a telling one but unfortunately there are many more examples of unfortunate government impediments right across the north.

The second crucial part to northern development is technology investment. As technology becomes more advanced we must harness its benefits.

I hope that you will join me later this year in Canberra as we launch Australia’s inaugural National Agriculture and Related Industries Day on 21 November.

This will be a day where we recognise the efforts of those who work in our agriculture industry and speak up for our industry and its importance to the Australian economy.

And of course, for those interested in the mining industry, please join us each year for the mining and related industries day, held annually on November 22.

I wish all attending an interesting and enjoyable conference, and let’s encourage the development of regional free trade agreements.

Thank you.

Article – ‘Natural resources drive a country’s economy’ conclude the key speakers at Global Natural Resources Conclave

by 22 June 2017

20 April 2017
India Partnered

‘Economic development cannot take a nation forward on its own. We need a society and economy which complement each other. ’- Narendra Modi

These inspiring lines from Prime Minister Narendra Modi underline the need for various socio and economic factors to work cohesively in order to achieve the desired development goals of a nation. And, a country can only progress if it aptly utilizes its natural resources to address its rising socio-economic challenges.

It is no secret that effective management of Natural Resources drives a country’s economy. Its immense potential can only be utilized if the countries develop a well thought out strategy to tap into its enormous potential. It goes without saying that the extractive sector can stimulate sustainable economic growth, create jobs and help bring people out of poverty.

The recently concluded Global Natural Resources Conclave, the first of its kind, organized by Network 18 and The Confederation of Indian Industry (CII), talked about the rapidly changing world scenarios that are making it mandatory for nations to explore their resource base to the hilt which will help them carve a niche for themselves at a global platform.

The conclave witnessed key industry speakers, several industry stalwarts and thinkers deliberate upon the present and the future challenges being faced by the ever-developing economy like ours, pertaining to the natural resources sector.

  • Highlighting how entrepreneurship and technology can drive India’s growth story, Vedanta Group Chairman Anil Agarwal talked about the vast contribution the natural resources sector can make to the existing economic development of the country.
  • Australia’s richest citizen Gina Rinehart, Executive Chairman of Hancock Prospecting – a privately owned mineral and exploration company, discussed the elimination of red tape and what both countries can hope to learn from each other.
  • JSW Group Chairman Sajjan Jindal underlined the need to make an optimum use of natural resources at the appropriate time so as to extract maximum benefits for the country’s economy.
  • Focusing on how policy changes can go a long way in improving India’s mineral resources landscape, Piyush Goyal, MoS (Independent Charge) for Power, Coal, New and Renewable Energy and Mines confirmed his faith in building a mutual development strategy for the nations.
  • Talking about the Global Natural Resources Conclave as a great platform to share ideas and discuss possibilities in the natural resources sector, Melody Meyer, President, Melody Meyer Energy LLC emphasized the need to pursue right investment strategies for energy development in India in the future.

The amalgamation of thought-provoking ideas with experts deliberating upon possibilities needed for growth of a country with respect to its natural resources sector at the Global Natural Resources Conclave paved the way for exploring some basic ground realities in terms of issues and opportunities concerning India’s natural resources.

Courtesy of India Partnered

DOUBLE WIN FOR GINA RINEHART AND ROY HILL AT THE PLATTS GLOBAL METALS AWARDS

by 6 June 2017

18 May 2017

Hancock Prospecting and Roy Hill are excited to announce that Executive Chairman, Mrs Gina Rinehart, and the Roy Hill project have been recognised at the prestigious Platts Global Metals Awards in London tonight, winning two awards.

Mrs Rinehart was awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award for her outstanding leadership in the mining and resources sector, and for her contribution to the development of that sector throughout her adult life.

Her leadership has included founding and patronage of Australia’s annual National Mining and Related Industries Day, many speeches on behalf of the industry and quarterly contributions to Australia’s Resources and Investment Magazine publication, founding and chair of Australians for Northern Development and Economic Vision (ANDEV), and two books, the most recent one called “From Red Tape to Red Carpet.”

Roy Hill, of which Mrs Rinehart is Executive Chair, was also recognised, winning the Rising Star Company Award for its spirit, milestones and impressive achievements as a largely Greenfield mega mine.

Accepting the Lifetime Achievement Award in London, Mrs Rinehart said she was very delighted to be acknowledged for a lifetime’s commitment and dedication to the mining and resources industry, most recently culminating in the highly successful delivery of the USD$10 billion Roy Hill iron ore project.

“The mining and resources industry with its many related industries is, I believe, a very important contributor to our country, and helps to maintain and improve living standards, so it means a lot to me to be recognised by my peers at these internationally renowned prestigious awards,” Mrs Rinehart said.

“There are many people who support me with these endeavours, especially Tad Watroba and my executives and my other hard-working, long-term and dedicated staff. We are also proud of our endeavours over decades at Hope Downs, three major mines were built there with our more recent partners, Rio Tinto, and a fourth is under development.”

Speaking following Roy Hill’s rising star win, Mrs Rinehart said of the project “we started very small, with very little money to spend, and worked hard to explore, finding the deposits which now form the Roy Hill operations, tenements another company had held for a long time, but chose to drop, believing of negligible value. Over many years we studied and progressed towards development despite all the thousands of government approvals permits and licences and other significant risks and roadblocks placed in front of us.”

“Roy Hill has achieved significant milestones – we are ramping up to be Australia’s single largest iron ore mine, we are the fastest to achieve shipment of 35 million tonnes and while doing so, maintained an above industry average safety record and female participation rate. We secured the world’s largest debt funding package for a mainly Greenfields land-based mining project from 19 of the largest banks in the world and five Export Credit Agencies, we use some of the world’s largest equipment in the mining industry, and Roy Hill marked the largest ever commercial deal between Australia and South Korea,” Gina Rinehart said.

“It has been a mammoth team effort to successfully manage the project from bankable feasibility to construction and ultimately to project operation and ramp up. Huge thanks to our partners, executives and every person who has contributed.”

ROY HILL RISING STAR WIN SPEECH

My partners, Marubeni, POSCO, together with ourselves at Hancock, are delighted to accept this prestigious award for Roy Hill.  Roy Hill at 55 million tonnes per annum is the single largest iron ore mine in Australia.  While other iron ore producers ship more than 55, they do that as a combination of production from multiple mines.  The scale of effort and inputs on which Roy Hill has been built make it a truly mega project.    The total amount of construction steel used for Roy Hill construction would be sufficient to build more than 20 Eiffel Towers.  The number of miles travelled by charter flights between Perth and minesite during the construction project equal three return trips to the moon!  To make it possible to a business of this size, complexity, quality ahead of schedule, under budget requires dedication, commitment, leadership of extraordinary nature.  Huge thanks to every person who contributed, and thank you again for this award.

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD WIN SPEECH   

Good evening, distinguished guests and friends.  It is a great privilege and pleasure to be with you all tonight, here in London.  London is thousands of miles away from where I grew up in the rugged north of West Australia, surrounded by heat, and dust, and flies, cattle and a heck of a lot of iron ore!  These have contributed to the rather unique Australian life that I have had, a wonderful life with my very special parents, Hope and Lang Hancock, and importantly have contributed to our country and it’s standards of living.  I would sincerely like to thank Platts for this prestigious lifetime award, which will have a place of honour in my heart and back in west Australia.  Thank you.

Article – Gina Rinehart & FMG Among Award Winners

by 5 June 2017

19 May 2017
National Mining Chronicle

Hancock Prospecting Group Executive Chairman Gina Rinehart, the Roy Hill project and Fortescue Metals Group were among the big winners at the prestigious Platts Global Metals Awards in London.

Mrs Rinehart was awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award for her leadership in the mining and resources sector, and for her contribution to the development of that sector throughout her adult life.

Her leadership has included founding and patronage of Australia’s annual National Mining and Related Industries Day, many speeches on behalf of the industry and quarterly contributions to Australia’s Resources and Investment Magazine publication, founding and chair of Australians for Northern Development and Economic Vision (ANDEV), and two books, the most recent one called “From Red Tape to Red Carpet.”

Roy Hill, of which Mrs Rinehart is also executive chair, was also recognised, winning the Rising Star Company Award for its spirit, milestones and impressive achievements as a largely Greenfield mega mine.

Accepting the Lifetime Achievement Award in London, Mrs Rinehart said she was very delighted to be acknowledged for a lifetime’s commitment and dedication to the mining and resources industry, most recently culminating in the highly successful delivery of the US$10 ($13.49) billion Roy Hill iron ore project.

“The mining and resources industry with its many related industries is, I believe, a very important contributor to our country, and helps to maintain and improve living standards, so it means a lot to me to be recognised by my peers at these internationally renowned prestigious awards,” Mrs Rinehart said.

“There are many people who support me with these endeavours, especially Tad Watroba and my executives and my other hard-working, long-term and dedicated staff. We are also proud of our endeavours over decades at Hope Downs, three major mines were built there with our more recent partners, Rio Tinto, and a fourth is under development.”

Speaking following Roy Hill’s rising star win, Mrs Rinehart said of the project “we started very small, with very little money to spend, and worked hard to explore, finding the deposits which now form the Roy Hill operations, tenements another company had held for a long time, but chose to drop, believing of negligible value. Over many years we studied and progressed towards development despite all the thousands of government approvals permits and licences and other significant risks and roadblocks placed in front of us.”

“Roy Hill has achieved significant milestones – we are ramping up to be Australia’s single largest iron ore mine, we are the fastest to achieve shipment of 35 million tonnes and while doing so, maintained an above industry average safety record and female participation rate. We secured the world’s largest debt funding package for a mainly Greenfields land-based mining project from 19 of the largest banks in the world and five Export Credit Agencies, we use some of the world’s largest equipment in the mining industry, and Roy Hill marked the largest ever commercial deal between Australia and South Korea,” Mrs Rinehart said.

“It has been a mammoth team effort to successfully manage the project from bankable feasibility to construction and ultimately to project operation and ramp up. Huge thanks to our partners, executives and every person who has contributed.”

Fortescue Metals Group (FMG), one of the world’s largest iron ore producers won the prestigious Metals Company of the Year award at the fifth annual Platts Global Metals Awards, which recognize exemplary performance in 15 categories across the steel, metals and mining complex.

FMG was one of 15 honorees from four continents heralded at the black-tie gala in central London. The event, hosted by S&P Global Platts, was once again emceed by CNBC’s Karen Tso and attended by more than 250 industry executives.

“Under the leadership of CEO Nev Power, Fortescue Metals Group has rapidly risen to become the fourth largest iron ore producer in the world in little over a decade. We congratulate Fortescue Metals Group on this impressive win,” S&P Global Platts President Martin Fraenkel said. “Each of this year’s winners and finalists deserves praise for their contributions to a more efficient, innovative and globalised industry that continues to rise to new challenges.”

Fortescue Metals Group won the 2017 Metals Company of the Year title as well as the Industry Leadership Award – Raw Materials & Mining. In reaching its decision, the Platts Global Metals Awards’ independent judging panel lauded the company’s “strong and clever” leadership. FMG, which won the Rising Star Company Award in 2014, was praised by the judges for “achieving ambitious goals and hitting targets” making the firm one of the industry’s strongest and most resilient.

Image: Gina Rinehart with Roy Hill Partners (Marubeni and POSCO) and Platts VPs and Karen Tso of CNBC, Credit: Roy Hill

Courtesy of the National Mining Chronicle